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9 Pin Serial Cable Wire Colors

Serial Port Wiring Diagram Color Wiring Diagram – Dell 9 Pin Serial To Usb Wiring Diagram Uploaded by Yamama on Tuesday, February 12th, 2019 in category USB Wiring Diagram. See also Gpio – How To Identify The Usb To Serial Wire Mismatched – Dell 9 Pin Serial To Usb Wiring Diagram from USB Wiring Diagram Topic.

Looking for a way to transmit data from one device to another quickly and securely? Thanks to RS232 serial port monitoring hardware, you should have no trouble capturing data and overcoming many of the latency and time-tagging problems commonly associated with traditional dual COM port monitoring solutions.

RS232 serial port monitoring hardware stands out for a number of reasons, including its 9 pin RS232 pinout. This pinout can make a world of difference for successful RS232 serial communications. Thus, it is important to understand how the 9 pin RS232 cable pinout can affect the flow of serial data between devices.

Here’s a closer look at how the 9 pin RS232 pinout works and what it means for users who want to transmit data between devices safely and efficiently.

What Is an RS232 9 Pin Pinout?

9 pin serial cable wire colors chart

RS232 monitoring hardware establishes a connection between data terminal equipment (DTE) and data communication equipment (DCE). In order to link these devices, an RS232 D9 pinout is essential, as this pinout will allow you to connect two devices successfully.

An RS232 pinout 9 pin cable features nine pins:

I'm looking to splice wires from a DB-sub (9 pin) connector out to a breadboard but I'm getting different pictures for color-coding which makes me confused. What's more confusing is the connect I have only has 4 wires form the cable despite having 9 pins. Null modem is a communication method to directly connect two DTEs (computer, terminal, printer, etc.) using an RS-232 serial cable.The name stems from the historical use of RS-232 cables to connect two teleprinter devices or two modems in order to communicate with one another; null modem communication refers to using a crossed-over RS-232 cable. Pinout of Null modem cables and layout of 9 pin D-SUB female connector and 25 pin D-SUB female connectorDE-9 to DE-9, DE-9 to DE-25 cables. Use this cable to connect two devices equipped with serial RS-232 interface. This cable may be used to connect any RS-232 equipped device to computer, connect two computers via COM serial port and so on. Glarks 635Pcs Connector Housing Male/Female Pin Connector 40 Pin 2.54mm Pitch Pin Headers and 10 Wire Rainbow Color Flat Ribbon IDC Wire Cable Compatible with Dupont Connector Assortment Kit 4.4 out of 5 stars 114.

1. Data Carrier Detect – After a data terminal is detected, a signal is sent to the data set that is going to be transmitted to the terminal.

2. Received Data – The data set receives the initial signal via the receive data line (RxD).

3. Transmitted DataAdobe audition 3.0 free download for windows 7 64 bit. – The data terminal gets a signal from the data set, a confirmation that there is a connection between the data terminal and the data set.

4. Data Terminal Ready – A positive voltage is applied to the data terminal ready (DTR) line, a sign that the data terminal is prepared for the transmission of data.

5. Signal Ground – A return for all the signals on a single interface, the signal ground (SG) offers a return path for serial communications. Without SG, serial data cannot be transmitted between devices.

9 Pin Serial Cable Pinout

6. Data Set Ready – A positive voltage is applied to the data set ready (DSR) line, which ensures the serial communications between a data terminal and a data set can be completed.

7. Request to Send – A positive voltage indicates the request to send (RTS) can be performed, which means the data set is able to send information to the data terminal without interference.

8. Clear to Send – After a connection has been established between a data terminal and a distant modem, a clear to send (CS) signal ensures the data terminal recognizes that communications can be performed.

9 Pin Serial Cable Wire Colors Chart

9. Ring Indicator – The ring indicator (RI) signal will be activated if a modem that operates as a data set detects low frequency. When this occurs, the data terminal is alerted, but the RI will not stop the flow of serial data between devices.

Understanding the ins and outs of the 9 pin RS232 cable pinout can be challenging for even experienced design services professionals. But with support from a proven engineering team, you can optimize the transmission of data via a RS232 9 pin pinout.

9 Pin Serial Plug

Stratus Engineering supplies a broad array of RS232 hardware monitoring solutions, along with application expertise and extensive hardware and software engineering experience. To learn more how we support electronics and software for embedded systems, please contact us today at 858-663-1841.

9 Pin Serial Connector

Comments

9 Pin Serial Cable Wire Colors Rgb

  • edited 2003-09-14 - 02:18:00
    Yea, It's call an OHM METER. Would that be CHINA STANDARD or KOREA STANDARD
    or JAPAN STANDARD or CANADIAN STANDARD or USA STANDARD ?
    Original MessageFrom: Christian Wentz [noparse][[/noparse]mailto:[email protected]h..]
    Sent: Saturday, September 13, 2003 7:19 PM
    To: [email protected]
    Subject: [noparse][[/noparse]basicstamps] serial cable color coding
    Would anyone happen to know of a resource that lists the standard serial
    cable color coding?
    _________________________________________________________________
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  • edited 2003-09-14 - 02:27:00
    I don't think there is a standard, but an old tech who used to work for
    me would do them (at least the first 10) in resistor color code, black,
    brown, red, etc.
    Al Williams
    AWC
    * Control 8 servos at once: http://www.al-williams.com/pak8.htm
    >Original Message> From: Christian Wentz [noparse][[/noparse]mailto:[email protected]]
    > Sent: Saturday, September 13, 2003 6:19 PM
    > To: [email protected]
    > Subject: [noparse][[/noparse]basicstamps] serial cable color coding
    >
    >
    > Would anyone happen to know of a resource that lists the
    > standard serial
    > cable color coding?
    >
    > _________________________________________________________________
    > Send and receive larger attachments with Hotmail Extra Storage.
    > http://join.msn.com/?PAGE=features/es
    >
    >
    > To UNSUBSCRIBE, just send mail to:
    > [email protected]
    > from the same email address that you subscribed. Text in the
    > Subject and Body of the message will be ignored.
    >
    >
    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
    > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
    >
    >
    >
    >
  • edited 2003-09-14 - 02:28:00
    There is no general standard for wire color on PC cabling, with the
    exception of marking pin 1 on ribbon cables, and the color of power
    supply and fan wiring. Everything else is probably gonna be factory or
    manufacturer specific.
    What Jim is trying to say is that because everyone has a different color
    code, you need to use an ohm meter or continuity tester to figure out
    what color wire goes to which pin on the cable that you have.
    > Yea, It's call an OHM METER. Would that be CHINA STANDARD or KOREA STANDARD
    > or JAPAN STANDARD or CANADIAN STANDARD or USA STANDARD ?
    > Would anyone happen to know of a resource that lists the standard serial
    > cable color coding?
  • edited 2003-09-14 - 02:34:00
    It may depend on if they use the metric or US color code as well? <grin>
    And don't get me started on the metric versus US electricity.
    > I don't think there is a standard, but an old tech who used to work for
    > me would do them (at least the first 10) in resistor color code, black,
    > brown, red, etc.
    > > Would anyone happen to know of a resource that lists the
    > > standard serial
    > > cable color coding?
  • edited 2003-09-14 - 04:15:00
    In a message dated 9/13/2003 6:27:55 PM Pacific Daylight Time,
    [email protected] writes:
    I don't think there is a standard, but an old tech who used to work for
    me would do them (at least the first 10) in resistor color code, black,
    brown, red, etc.
    Al Williams
    AWC
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    I do the same, and think it is a good idea. If you are consistent with this
    method, at least one knows number 1 through 10
    [noparse][[/noparse]Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
  • edited 2003-09-14 - 05:03:00
    I do not think the color coding of cables is arbitrarily.
    If you look a telephoneman splicing hundreds of wires , they follow
    a color code scheme.
    Perhaps there is an ANSI standard (they have standards for almost
    everythinng).
  • edited 2003-09-14 - 16:23:00
    If you are a telephone man, with a 50-pair telephone
    cable, you'd better have a standard for what pair
    of wires goes where. If you're installing a
    50 foot 8-wire cable between a PC and a Modem, you have
    a lot more lattitude.
    If you are installing an 'RS-232' 'Standard' cable
    (ansi standard RS-232, RS-232b, RS-232c) well:
    You could install a DB25 with all pins connected,
    all pins defined -- but I don't think they spec
    the color.
    You could install a DB25 with only the common 8
    lines -- RX,TX, CTS,RTS, DCD,DTR,DTS, and Ground.
    Oops, forgot 'RI' (ring) used by the PC as IRQ input.
    Or you could do DB9. Or you could do RJ45 (like
    DEC and Stallion did). Or you could do 'three-wire'
    (TX, RX and Ground).
    The point is: the RS-232 'Standard' came out so
    early that it's evolved quite a lot, and been
    used in MANY form factors. It's amazing
    that it's as portable, and still works, as it is.
    There IS a specification, but I really don't think
    it calls out wire colors.
    --- In [email protected], 'Albert Catano'
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I do not think the color coding of cables is arbitrarily.
    > If you look a telephoneman splicing hundreds of wires , they
    follow
    > a color code scheme.
    > Perhaps there is an ANSI standard (they have standards for almost
    > everythinng).
  • edited 2003-09-14 - 18:02:00
    Well I would think there would be a standard ! if nothing more than just pin
    to color standard ! But I can't find anything. I have used wire color to pin
    numbers, but can't find the chart, and it wasn't specific to rs232.
    Larry Gaminde
    Original MessageFrom: 'Bill Boyer' <[email protected]>
    To: 'Basic Stamp List' <[email protected]>
    Sent: September 13, 2003 6:28 PM
    Subject: RE: [noparse][[/noparse]basicstamps] serial cable color coding
    > There is no general standard for wire color on PC cabling, with the
    > exception of marking pin 1 on ribbon cables, and the color of power
    > supply and fan wiring. Everything else is probably gonna be factory or
    > manufacturer specific.
    >
    > What Jim is trying to say is that because everyone has a different color
    > code, you need to use an ohm meter or continuity tester to figure out
    > what color wire goes to which pin on the cable that you have.
    >
    >
    > > Yea, It's call an OHM METER. Would that be CHINA STANDARD or KOREA
    STANDARD
    > > or JAPAN STANDARD or CANADIAN STANDARD or USA STANDARD ?
    >
    > > Would anyone happen to know of a resource that lists the standard serial
    > > cable color coding?
    >
    >
    >
    > To UNSUBSCRIBE, just send mail to:
    > [email protected]
    > from the same email address that you subscribed. Text in the Subject and
    Body of the message will be ignored.
    >
    >
    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
    >
    >
    >
  • edited 2003-09-15 - 02:00:00
    Now I lay me down to sleep
    With a roll of cable at my feet
    If I should die before I wake
    White, Blue, Orange, Green, Brown, Slate.
    Original MessageFrom: 'Allan Lane' <[email protected]>
    To: <[email protected]>
    Sent: Sunday, September 14, 2003 8:23 AM
    Subject: [noparse][[/noparse]basicstamps] Re: serial cable color coding
    > If you are a telephone man, with a 50-pair telephone
    > cable, you'd better have a standard for what pair
    > of wires goes where. If you're installing a
    > 50 foot 8-wire cable between a PC and a Modem, you have
    > a lot more lattitude.
    >
    > If you are installing an 'RS-232' 'Standard' cable
    > (ansi standard RS-232, RS-232b, RS-232c) well:
    > You could install a DB25 with all pins connected,
    > all pins defined -- but I don't think they spec
    > the color.
    >
    > You could install a DB25 with only the common 8
    > lines -- RX,TX, CTS,RTS, DCD,DTR,DTS, and Ground.
    > Oops, forgot 'RI' (ring) used by the PC as IRQ input.
    >
    > Or you could do DB9. Or you could do RJ45 (like
    > DEC and Stallion did). Or you could do 'three-wire'
    > (TX, RX and Ground).
    >
    > The point is: the RS-232 'Standard' came out so
    > early that it's evolved quite a lot, and been
    > used in MANY form factors. It's amazing
    > that it's as portable, and still works, as it is.
    > There IS a specification, but I really don't think
    > it calls out wire colors.
    >
    >
    > --- In [email protected], 'Albert Catano'
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > I do not think the color coding of cables is arbitrarily.
    > > If you look a telephoneman splicing hundreds of wires , they
    > follow
    > > a color code scheme.
    > > Perhaps there is an ANSI standard (they have standards for almost
    > > everythinng).
    >
    >
    > To UNSUBSCRIBE, just send mail to:
    > [email protected]
    > from the same email address that you subscribed. Text in the Subject and
    Body of the message will be ignored.
    >
    >
    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
    >
    >
    >
    >
  • edited 2003-09-15 - 02:01:00
    As Allan and others have said, there is not a standard for wire colors.
    Each factory lot will use the same color sequence, but different
    factories/lots will vary. We use a M-F DB9 cable for a commercial
    device, by cutting the cable at one end, discarding the connector, and
    wiring the cable to our circuits, using a few hundred per year. We try
    to buy from the same place, but periodically check the colors and pins
    to avoid circuit disasters. We like and use black cables from Jameco,
    to match our black instrument cases.
    Dennis
    Original MessageFrom: Allan Lane [noparse][[/noparse]mailto:[email protected]]
    Sent: Sunday, September 14, 2003 8:24 AM
    To: [email protected]
    Subject: [noparse][[/noparse]basicstamps] Re: serial cable color coding
    If you are a telephone man, with a 50-pair telephone
    cable, you'd better have a standard for what pair
    of wires goes where. If you're installing a
    50 foot 8-wire cable between a PC and a Modem, you have
    a lot more lattitude.
    If you are installing an 'RS-232' 'Standard' cable
    (ansi standard RS-232, RS-232b, RS-232c) well:
    You could install a DB25 with all pins connected,
    all pins defined -- but I don't think they spec
    the color.
    You could install a DB25 with only the common 8
    lines -- RX,TX, CTS,RTS, DCD,DTR,DTS, and Ground.
    Oops, forgot 'RI' (ring) used by the PC as IRQ input.
    Or you could do DB9. Or you could do RJ45 (like
    DEC and Stallion did). Or you could do 'three-wire'
    (TX, RX and Ground).
    The point is: the RS-232 'Standard' came out so
    early that it's evolved quite a lot, and been
    used in MANY form factors. It's amazing
    that it's as portable, and still works, as it is.
    There IS a specification, but I really don't think
    it calls out wire colors.
    --- In [email protected], 'Albert Catano'
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I do not think the color coding of cables is arbitrarily.
    > If you look a telephoneman splicing hundreds of wires , they
    follow
    > a color code scheme.
    > Perhaps there is an ANSI standard (they have standards for almost
    > everythinng).
    To UNSUBSCRIBE, just send mail to:
    [email protected]
    from the same email address that you subscribed. Text in the Subject
    and Body of the message will be ignored.
    Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
    http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
  • edited 2003-09-15 - 02:31:00
    Speaking of that, does anyone still make a cable with removeable shells?
    Most everything I see has molded ends, which means you have to chop off
    one end and put on a fresh connector if you need to make a custom cable.
    > As Allan and others have said, there is not a standard for wire colors.
    > Each factory lot will use the same color sequence, but different
    > factories/lots will vary. We use a M-F DB9 cable for a commercial
    > device, by cutting the cable at one end, discarding the connector, and
    > wiring the cable to our circuits, using a few hundred per year. We try
    > to buy from the same place, but periodically check the colors and pins
    > to avoid circuit disasters. We like and use black cables from Jameco,
    > to match our black instrument cases.
  • edited 2003-09-15 - 16:08:00
    Bad -- Black -- 0
    boys -- Brown -- 1
    race -- Red -- 2
    our -- Orange -- 3
    young -- Yellow -- 4
    girls -- Green -- 5
    behind -- Blue -- 6
    victory -- Violet -- 7
    garden -- Gray -- 8
    walls -- White -- 9
    Above is a non-bawdy version of the resistor
    numbering color sequence, which DOES NOT apply
    (necessarily) to RS-232. ('Bad boys rape our
    young girls, but violet gives willingly' is
    the 'PG-13' version)
    Note that CAT-5 cable has Orange/Orange-Stripe,
    Blue/Blue-Stripe, Green/Green-Stripe,
    Brown/Brown-Stripe. This CAN be used for
    RS-232 also.
    --- In [email protected], 'Stephen H Chapman'
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Now I lay me down to sleep
    > With a roll of cable at my feet
    > If I should die before I wake
    > White, Blue, Orange, Green, Brown, Slate.
    >
    >Original Message> From: 'Allan Lane' <[email protected]>
    > To: <[email protected]>
    > Sent: Sunday, September 14, 2003 8:23 AM
    > Subject: [noparse][[/noparse]basicstamps] Re: serial cable color coding
    >
    >
    > > If you are a telephone man, with a 50-pair telephone
    > > cable, you'd better have a standard for what pair
    > > of wires goes where. If you're installing a
    > > 50 foot 8-wire cable between a PC and a Modem, you have
    > > a lot more lattitude.
    > >
    > > If you are installing an 'RS-232' 'Standard' cable
    > > (ansi standard RS-232, RS-232b, RS-232c) well:
    > > You could install a DB25 with all pins connected,
    > > all pins defined -- but I don't think they spec
    > > the color.
    > >
    > > You could install a DB25 with only the common 8
    > > lines -- RX,TX, CTS,RTS, DCD,DTR,DTS, and Ground.
    > > Oops, forgot 'RI' (ring) used by the PC as IRQ input.
    > >
    > > Or you could do DB9. Or you could do RJ45 (like
    > > DEC and Stallion did). Or you could do 'three-wire'
    > > (TX, RX and Ground).
    > >
    > > The point is: the RS-232 'Standard' came out so
    > > early that it's evolved quite a lot, and been
    > > used in MANY form factors. It's amazing
    > > that it's as portable, and still works, as it is.
    > > There IS a specification, but I really don't think
    > > it calls out wire colors.
    > >
    > >
    > > --- In [email protected], 'Albert Catano'
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > > I do not think the color coding of cables is arbitrarily.
    > > > If you look a telephoneman splicing hundreds of wires , they
    > > follow
    > > > a color code scheme.
    > > > Perhaps there is an ANSI standard (they have standards for
    almost
    > > > everythinng).
    > >
    > >
    > > To UNSUBSCRIBE, just send mail to:
    > > [email protected]
    > > from the same email address that you subscribed. Text in the
    Subject and
    > Body of the message will be ignored.
    > >
    > >
    > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
    http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
  • edited 2003-09-15 - 18:31:00
    I collect these.
    There are many variations on the Bad boys.. I have also heard Bad Beer
    Rots Our Young Guts but Vodka Goes Well.
    Bad Betty runs over your garden but Violet Gray won't
    Billy Brown Revives On Your Gin, But Values Good Whisky
    Better Be Ready, Or Your Great Big Venture Goes West
    Black Beetles Running On Your Garden Bring Very Good Weather
    The one about batman is unrepeatable but the clean version is
    Batman Bests Robin On Yonder Gotham Bridge; Very Good, Will Get
    Superman Next
    Al Williams
    AWC
    * Add floating point math to your Stamp program:
    http://www.al-williams.com/pak1.htm
    >Original Message> From: Allan Lane [noparse][[/noparse]mailto:[email protected]]
    > Sent: Monday, September 15, 2003 10:09 AM
    > To: [email protected]
    > Subject: [noparse][[/noparse]basicstamps] Re: serial cable color coding
    >
    >
    > Bad -- Black -- 0
    > boys -- Brown -- 1
    > race -- Red -- 2
    > our -- Orange -- 3
    > young -- Yellow -- 4
    > girls -- Green -- 5
    > behind -- Blue -- 6
    > victory -- Violet -- 7
    > garden -- Gray -- 8
    > walls -- White -- 9
    >
    > Above is a non-bawdy version of the resistor
    > numbering color sequence, which DOES NOT apply
    > (necessarily) to RS-232. ('Bad boys rape our
    > young girls, but violet gives willingly' is
    > the 'PG-13' version)
    >
    > Note that CAT-5 cable has Orange/Orange-Stripe,
    > Blue/Blue-Stripe, Green/Green-Stripe,
    > Brown/Brown-Stripe. This CAN be used for
    > RS-232 also.
    >
    > --- In [email protected], 'Stephen H Chapman'
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > Now I lay me down to sleep
    > > With a roll of cable at my feet
    > > If I should die before I wake
    > > White, Blue, Orange, Green, Brown, Slate.
    > >
    > >Original Message> > From: 'Allan Lane' <[email protected]>
    > > To: <[email protected]>
    > > Sent: Sunday, September 14, 2003 8:23 AM
    > > Subject: [noparse][[/noparse]basicstamps] Re: serial cable color coding
    > >
    > >
    > > > If you are a telephone man, with a 50-pair telephone
    > > > cable, you'd better have a standard for what pair
    > > > of wires goes where. If you're installing a
    > > > 50 foot 8-wire cable between a PC and a Modem, you have
    > > > a lot more lattitude.
    > > >
    > > > If you are installing an 'RS-232' 'Standard' cable
    > > > (ansi standard RS-232, RS-232b, RS-232c) well:
    > > > You could install a DB25 with all pins connected,
    > > > all pins defined -- but I don't think they spec
    > > > the color.
    > > >
    > > > You could install a DB25 with only the common 8
    > > > lines -- RX,TX, CTS,RTS, DCD,DTR,DTS, and Ground.
    > > > Oops, forgot 'RI' (ring) used by the PC as IRQ input.
    > > >
    > > > Or you could do DB9. Or you could do RJ45 (like
    > > > DEC and Stallion did). Or you could do 'three-wire'
    > > > (TX, RX and Ground).
    > > >
    > > > The point is: the RS-232 'Standard' came out so
    > > > early that it's evolved quite a lot, and been
    > > > used in MANY form factors. It's amazing
    > > > that it's as portable, and still works, as it is.
    > > > There IS a specification, but I really don't think
    > > > it calls out wire colors.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > --- In [email protected], 'Albert Catano'
    > > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > > > I do not think the color coding of cables is
    > arbitrarily. If you
    > > > > look a telephoneman splicing hundreds of wires , they
    > > > follow
    > > > > a color code scheme.
    > > > > Perhaps there is an ANSI standard (they have standards for
    > almost
    > > > > everythinng).
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > To UNSUBSCRIBE, just send mail to:
    > > > [email protected]
    > > > from the same email address that you subscribed. Text in the
    > Subject and
    > > Body of the message will be ignored.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
    > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    >
    >
    > To UNSUBSCRIBE, just send mail to:
    > [email protected]
    > from the same email address that you subscribed. Text in the
    > Subject and Body of the message will be ignored.
    >
    >
    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
    http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
  • edited 2003-09-15 - 18:42:00
    Could you send me the R or X versions off list.
    Larry Gaminde
    Original MessageFrom: 'Al Williams' <[email protected]>
    To: <[email protected]>
    Sent: September 15, 2003 10:31 AM
    Subject: RE: [noparse][[/noparse]basicstamps] Re: serial cable color coding
    > I collect these.
    >
    > There are many variations on the Bad boys.. I have also heard Bad Beer
    > Rots Our Young Guts but Vodka Goes Well.
    >
    > Bad Betty runs over your garden but Violet Gray won't
    >
    > Billy Brown Revives On Your Gin, But Values Good Whisky
    >
    > Better Be Ready, Or Your Great Big Venture Goes West
    >
    > Black Beetles Running On Your Garden Bring Very Good Weather
    >
    > The one about batman is unrepeatable but the clean version is
    > Batman Bests Robin On Yonder Gotham Bridge; Very Good, Will Get
    > Superman Next
    >
    > Al Williams
    > AWC
    > * Add floating point math to your Stamp program:
    > http://www.al-williams.com/pak1.htm
    >
    >
    > >Original Message> > From: Allan Lane [noparse][[/noparse]mailto:[email protected]]
    > > Sent: Monday, September 15, 2003 10:09 AM
    > > To: [email protected]
    > > Subject: [noparse][[/noparse]basicstamps] Re: serial cable color coding
    > >
    > >
    > > Bad -- Black -- 0
    > > boys -- Brown -- 1
    > > race -- Red -- 2
    > > our -- Orange -- 3
    > > young -- Yellow -- 4
    > > girls -- Green -- 5
    > > behind -- Blue -- 6
    > > victory -- Violet -- 7
    > > garden -- Gray -- 8
    > > walls -- White -- 9
    > >
    > > Above is a non-bawdy version of the resistor
    > > numbering color sequence, which DOES NOT apply
    > > (necessarily) to RS-232. ('Bad boys rape our
    > > young girls, but violet gives willingly' is
    > > the 'PG-13' version)
    > >
    > > Note that CAT-5 cable has Orange/Orange-Stripe,
    > > Blue/Blue-Stripe, Green/Green-Stripe,
    > > Brown/Brown-Stripe. This CAN be used for
    > > RS-232 also.
    > >
    > > --- In [email protected], 'Stephen H Chapman'
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > > Now I lay me down to sleep
    > > > With a roll of cable at my feet
    > > > If I should die before I wake
    > > > White, Blue, Orange, Green, Brown, Slate.
    > > >
    > > >Original Message> > > From: 'Allan Lane' <[email protected]>
    > > > To: <[email protected]m>
    > > > Sent: Sunday, September 14, 2003 8:23 AM
    > > > Subject: [noparse][[/noparse]basicstamps] Re: serial cable color coding
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > > If you are a telephone man, with a 50-pair telephone
    > > > > cable, you'd better have a standard for what pair
    > > > > of wires goes where. If you're installing a
    > > > > 50 foot 8-wire cable between a PC and a Modem, you have
    > > > > a lot more lattitude.
    > > > >
    > > > > If you are installing an 'RS-232' 'Standard' cable
    > > > > (ansi standard RS-232, RS-232b, RS-232c) well:
    > > > > You could install a DB25 with all pins connected,
    > > > > all pins defined -- but I don't think they spec
    > > > > the color.
    > > > >
    > > > > You could install a DB25 with only the common 8
    > > > > lines -- RX,TX, CTS,RTS, DCD,DTR,DTS, and Ground.
    > > > > Oops, forgot 'RI' (ring) used by the PC as IRQ input.
    > > > >
    > > > > Or you could do DB9. Or you could do RJ45 (like
    > > > > DEC and Stallion did). Or you could do 'three-wire'
    > > > > (TX, RX and Ground).
    > > > >
    > > > > The point is: the RS-232 'Standard' came out so
    > > > > early that it's evolved quite a lot, and been
    > > > > used in MANY form factors. It's amazing
    > > > > that it's as portable, and still works, as it is.
    > > > > There IS a specification, but I really don't think
    > > > > it calls out wire colors.
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > --- In [email protected], 'Albert Catano'
    > > > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > > > > I do not think the color coding of cables is
    > > arbitrarily. If you
    > > > > > look a telephoneman splicing hundreds of wires , they
    > > > > follow
    > > > > > a color code scheme.
    > > > > > Perhaps there is an ANSI standard (they have standards for
    > > almost
    > > > > > everythinng).
    > > > >
    > > > >
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  • edited 2003-09-16 - 01:05:00
    Just remember, B is blue, while black is K on alot of diagrams.
    > I collect these.
    >
    > There are many variations on the Bad boys.. I have also heard Bad Beer
    > Rots Our Young Guts but Vodka Goes Well.
    >
    > Bad Betty runs over your garden but Violet Gray won't
    >
    > Billy Brown Revives On Your Gin, But Values Good Whisky
    >
    > Better Be Ready, Or Your Great Big Venture Goes West
    >
    > Black Beetles Running On Your Garden Bring Very Good Weather
    >
    > The one about batman is unrepeatable but the clean version is
    > Batman Bests Robin On Yonder Gotham Bridge; Very Good, Will Get
    > Superman Next